Customer Service      FAQ      Email Sign Up      My Account      View Cart     
YoYoExpert Forums
May 29, 2017, 02:13:31 PM
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Welcome to the Forums!  Try out our new and improved chat room!
 
   Home   Chat Help Search Calendar Login Register  
Pages: 1 ... 9 10 11 12 13 [14] 15   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Does anyone use Fountain Pens?  (Read 17099 times)
beherenow
Trade Count: (32)

Offline Offline

United States United States

Fav. Yo-Yo: KLR
Fav. Trick: Brother slack to Ninja Vanish
Posts: 326

Thank You
-Given: 73
-Receive: 79


Chain Reaction 5.12c Smith Rocks Oregon


View Profile
« Reply #195 on: December 25, 2015, 01:53:53 PM »

While I too, have also enjoyed the Noodlers inks I have a few questions and observations.

Noodlers inks are both dark and vivid. But some sites have questioned this feature of Noodler's inks. I would like to hear any first-hand experience with this.

Many sites claim that Noodler's ink uses solids and binding proteins to achieve the amazing colors that Noodler's definitely has. But solids not only clog the pen and nib - they also tend to degrade the inner-workings of the pen over time according to some.

I have noticed that those that have opined that Noodler's were the best; seem to also use relatively low-priced "commodity" pens. What is the opinion of Noodlers with a high-quality pen where long term preservation is a value proposition - like a Montblanc? Is Noodlers "good" for pens? How about Gold nibs?

On the topic of inks; I have been using the Pilot Iroshizuku inks for a few weeks now. Suffice it to say that I have quickly lost much of my enamouration with many other inks in favor of the eye-catching, subtle tones that this line offers.

Cheers.
 
I've felt the same way with Noodler's a few years ago but I've had a Pilot 18k EF inked with bulletproof black for 3+ years now, continuously, and never had a problem other than a hard start.  But the pen has set unused for a month or longer so I didn't blame the ink for the hard starts.  I've also read the ink is highly saturated and that seems true from what I've used.  I like them mainly for their bulletproof inks and the eel series works well in some dryer EF nibs I've had before I started tuning my nibs myself.  I've never had Noodler's clog a pen over time either but I have had some pretty bad ink properties in use on certain colors.  Rachmaninoff will not flow well at all.  I've read you can dilute it with water and that will help but haven't tried it yet.  That's one thing you can do with Noodler's inks and not loose any color people say since they are so highly saturated.

The Iroshizuku inks can't be beat imho.  Plus I like the bottle.   Smiley  Some of their inks have as much sheen as the J. Herbin 1670's and others.  I have noticed nothing settle's at the bottom of the bottle in the Iroshizuku nor do they say to shake the bottle up before use so the sheen stays suspended in the ink.

Does anyone here use piston-fillers? I am interested in whether others use them.

I would like to hear why you like them; and which one's you find most enjoyable?

If you hate piston-fillers, I would love to hear why?

If you do not care, then please ignore :-)


For a piston filler, I too love the TWSBI 580's!  This pen always starts with good ink even after a month sitting cap up on my desk.  Writes smooth and effortlessly and holds a lot of ink.  Thought of trying the discontinued TWSBI Vac700 for a vacuum filler since it's a larger pen.
The Noodler's Konrad is a piston filler but I like the Ahab better personally for it's size and ease of use.

Also, haven't posted in a while but made this for the 'Ol Lady for our Anniversary.  Was inspired by random butterfly stuff I found through Google image search  Wink
Nice picture BIG NIC!

Still haven't tried the new Diamine Shimmer but Brandy Dazzle looked good to me along with the blue with the silver sheen.

On a whole other writing instrument, I finally tried the Blackwing pencil.  Nice pencils!





Logged

The terrible thing about free soloing difficult routes is the chance that faced with ultimate danger and need for ultimate self-control, oneís nerve might fail and cause an error. Thatís irony of it,that fear could short-circuit skill,that one would die as a direct result of being afraid to die. R.R
YoyoGeezer
Trade Count: (108)

Offline Offline

United States United States

Fav. Yo-Yo: Ti Walker, Draupnir
Fav. Trick: The one I can't quite get.
Posts: 1669

Thank You
-Given: 213
-Receive: 362



View Profile Email
« Reply #196 on: February 02, 2016, 08:31:47 AM »

I thought this link might be of interest (I hope it is ok). Richard is sort of the patron-saint of old fountain pens. Check out his collection too.

     http://www.richardspens.com/ref/care/inks.htm


Logged
theappe
Trade Count: (12)

Offline Offline

United States United States

Fav. Yo-Yo: C3 Teleport
Fav. Trick: Lotus Bloom
Posts: 196

Thank You
-Given: 14
-Receive: 13


View Profile Email
« Reply #197 on: February 03, 2016, 08:29:06 AM »

Thanks for the link.

I read some of the stuff and unlike he mentioned I havent had issues with noodler's ink or private reserve.
Logged
YoyoGeezer
Trade Count: (108)

Offline Offline

United States United States

Fav. Yo-Yo: Ti Walker, Draupnir
Fav. Trick: The one I can't quite get.
Posts: 1669

Thank You
-Given: 213
-Receive: 362



View Profile Email
« Reply #198 on: February 04, 2016, 03:51:58 PM »

Thanks for the link.

I read some of the stuff and unlike he mentioned I havent had issues with noodler's ink or private reserve.

I am using Private Reserve in my Lamy right now. The Claret is fabulous. I have never had any issues either. The point of my original post was about using Noodler's in vintage, or expensive classics like a Mont Blanc Meisterstuck.

I do not usually buy new pens. Rather, I get old models online and restore them with proper modern materials. I have found that old fountain pens can be both better; and cheaper than many expensive, modern pens. After reading Richard's comments, I hesitate to use these inks in my older pens. That is not based on my experience, it is based on Richard's experience with literally hundreds of old pens.
Logged
beherenow
Trade Count: (32)

Offline Offline

United States United States

Fav. Yo-Yo: KLR
Fav. Trick: Brother slack to Ninja Vanish
Posts: 326

Thank You
-Given: 73
-Receive: 79


Chain Reaction 5.12c Smith Rocks Oregon


View Profile
« Reply #199 on: April 20, 2016, 09:10:47 PM »

I thought this link might be of interest (I hope it is ok). Richard is sort of the patron-saint of old fountain pens. Check out his collection too.
     http://www.richardspens.com/ref/care/inks.htm

I am using Private Reserve in my Lamy right now. The Claret is fabulous. I have never had any issues either. The point of my original post was about using Noodler's in vintage, or expensive classics like a Mont Blanc Meisterstuck.

I do not usually buy new pens. Rather, I get old models online and restore them with proper modern materials. I have found that old fountain pens can be both better; and cheaper than many expensive, modern pens. After reading Richard's comments, I hesitate to use these inks in my older pens. That is not based on my experience, it is based on Richard's experience with literally hundreds of old pens.


I think there was a batch of inks from different manufactures over the years that have gotten contaminated and some molded.  Luckily none of mine have as some I've had open for years.  Mainly the PR 110ml SE inks.

I've used Noodler's in my vintage pens and haven't had any issues but that's on limited colors and most were known to behave per reviews.

I've really enjoyed restoring pens.  Started on Esterbrook and moved on to others.  My favorites have been the larger Pilot Vacumatics.  I really like the striping and vintage look overall.

Finally got around to trying the Tomoe River paper!  Nice paper.  It is smooth and 'velvety' as others mentioned.  Being so thin you would think it would bleed through but it holds ink well with a longer dry time of course.  The only thing I don't like is the depression left from the page above's writing.  Being so thin you can easily see what you just wrote on the underlying page and a flex pen makes it even worse.  So using a divider between sheets may be necessary depending on your preference.

Logged

The terrible thing about free soloing difficult routes is the chance that faced with ultimate danger and need for ultimate self-control, oneís nerve might fail and cause an error. Thatís irony of it,that fear could short-circuit skill,that one would die as a direct result of being afraid to die. R.R
YoyoGeezer
Trade Count: (108)

Offline Offline

United States United States

Fav. Yo-Yo: Ti Walker, Draupnir
Fav. Trick: The one I can't quite get.
Posts: 1669

Thank You
-Given: 213
-Receive: 362



View Profile Email
« Reply #200 on: April 21, 2016, 06:58:22 PM »

I think there was a batch of inks from different manufactures over the years that have gotten contaminated and some molded.  Luckily none of mine have as some I've had open for years.  Mainly the PR 110ml SE inks.

I've used Noodler's in my vintage pens and haven't had any issues but that's on limited colors and most were known to behave per reviews.

I've really enjoyed restoring pens.  Started on Esterbrook and moved on to others.  My favorites have been the larger Pilot Vacumatics.  I really like the striping and vintage look overall.

Finally got around to trying the Tomoe River paper!  Nice paper.  It is smooth and 'velvety' as others mentioned.  Being so thin you would think it would bleed through but it holds ink well with a longer dry time of course.  The only thing I don't like is the depression left from the page above's writing.  Being so thin you can easily see what you just wrote on the underlying page and a flex pen makes it even worse.  So using a divider between sheets may be necessary depending on your preference.



I too, use Noodler's in my Pens; vintage or not. I was only wondering what others thought.

I have never restored a Pilot Vacumatic. I have a Pilot Custom 823 Piston-filler; but even I would hesitate to take it apart. They are notoriously difficult to work on. Besides, it is one of my favorite pens of all. Damaging it would be catastrophic. :-)

Esterbrooks are a great place to start. They are relatively inexpensive and there are tons of spare parts available. I mostly restore Sheaffer and Parker because they have the best retail values and spare parts like sacs/spares are also easily obtained.

It is fun to take a dingy, old crusted pen and give it a good cleaning as well as replacing what is worn. Writing with a like-new pen that is almost twice my considerable age; is kind of cool. These are pens that were made when fountain pens were actually in use. Unlike many modern pens, these are smooth as glass and QUIET when used.

Old, mass-produced consumer-level pens I love:

1. Sheaffer Pen For Men - Simply the best.
2. Sheaffer Imperial (14k nib please)
3. Parker 51 & good 21's  (I like aerometric better; but vacumatics are fine too)
4. Parker 75 - 14k nib.
5. Sheaffer Snorkel (Clipper, Statesman, Valiant, Autograph...)
« Last Edit: April 21, 2016, 08:47:41 PM by YoyoGeezer » Logged
Adhuck
Trade Count: (0)

Offline Offline

United States United States

Fav. Yo-Yo: Duncan Triump
Fav. Trick: eli hop
Posts: 44

Thank You
-Given: 0
-Receive: 2


View Profile
« Reply #201 on: April 22, 2016, 03:57:36 PM »

I liked using a cheapo ultrasonic cleaner on mine. It was not a necessity, but it was neat to watch the ink slowly creep out of the nib while in the bath. Plus the cleaner actually got the crusty stuff out of the nose pads of my glasses.
Logged
YoyoGeezer
Trade Count: (108)

Offline Offline

United States United States

Fav. Yo-Yo: Ti Walker, Draupnir
Fav. Trick: The one I can't quite get.
Posts: 1669

Thank You
-Given: 213
-Receive: 362



View Profile Email
« Reply #202 on: April 22, 2016, 04:24:32 PM »

I liked using a cheapo ultrasonic cleaner on mine. It was not a necessity, but it was neat to watch the ink slowly creep out of the nib while in the bath. Plus the cleaner actually got the crusty stuff out of the nose pads of my glasses.

Totally agree. I have soaked, washed and scrubbed parts that when put into an ultrasonic cleaner just seem to leak ink. There seems to be a real affinity between ultrasonic cleaners and dried ink. If you want to really clean your pen - you have to use an ultrasonic with HOT water and a bit of pen-cleaner (Koh-I-Noor is my favorite - what's yours?). 
Many older pens can be successfully restored by just taking it apart for a deep cleaning. Parker 51's with aerometric fillers are like that. The sac is almost always fine, just completely clogged with old, dried ink. A couple of runs through the ultrasonic cleaner; and when put back together they work like new.
Logged
OhDavidBowie
Trade Count: (11)

Offline Offline

United States United States

Fav. Yo-Yo: Recess First Base, Turning Point Palpitation. CLYW Borealis
Fav. Trick: Counterweight stuff
Posts: 57

Thank You
-Given: 4
-Receive: 6



View Profile Email
« Reply #203 on: April 22, 2016, 07:10:38 PM »

This thread makes me feel guilty for leaving ink in my pens for so long. I only really use my Platinum 3776 regularly and I have 5 or so inked

-Josh

Logged
beherenow
Trade Count: (32)

Offline Offline

United States United States

Fav. Yo-Yo: KLR
Fav. Trick: Brother slack to Ninja Vanish
Posts: 326

Thank You
-Given: 73
-Receive: 79


Chain Reaction 5.12c Smith Rocks Oregon


View Profile
« Reply #204 on: May 01, 2016, 04:44:04 PM »

I too, use Noodler's in my Pens; vintage or not. I was only wondering what others thought.

I have never restored a Pilot Vacumatic. I have a Pilot Custom 823 Piston-filler; but even I would hesitate to take it apart. They are notoriously difficult to work on. Besides, it is one of my favorite pens of all. Damaging it would be catastrophic. :-)

Esterbrooks are a great place to start. They are relatively inexpensive and there are tons of spare parts available. I mostly restore Sheaffer and Parker because they have the best retail values and spare parts like sacs/spares are also easily obtained.

It is fun to take a dingy, old crusted pen and give it a good cleaning as well as replacing what is worn. Writing with a like-new pen that is almost twice my considerable age; is kind of cool. These are pens that were made when fountain pens were actually in use. Unlike many modern pens, these are smooth as glass and QUIET when used.

Old, mass-produced consumer-level pens I love:

1. Sheaffer Pen For Men - Simply the best.
2. Sheaffer Imperial (14k nib please)
3. Parker 51 & good 21's  (I like aerometric better; but vacumatics are fine too)
4. Parker 75 - 14k nib.
5. Sheaffer Snorkel (Clipper, Statesman, Valiant, Autograph...)

They're Parker Vacumatic's, not Pilot.   Smiley  Don't know why I typed Pilot?

The Sheaffer Snorkel is a neat pen!  I liked the snorkel idea but also like filling through the nib to prime it. 
The good thing with Esterbrook's "J" series is there are plenty of NOS nibs still around, even the flex nibs although they will cost you more than the pen.

You can't beat ultrasonic cleaners for FP's!
Logged

The terrible thing about free soloing difficult routes is the chance that faced with ultimate danger and need for ultimate self-control, oneís nerve might fail and cause an error. Thatís irony of it,that fear could short-circuit skill,that one would die as a direct result of being afraid to die. R.R
beherenow
Trade Count: (32)

Offline Offline

United States United States

Fav. Yo-Yo: KLR
Fav. Trick: Brother slack to Ninja Vanish
Posts: 326

Thank You
-Given: 73
-Receive: 79


Chain Reaction 5.12c Smith Rocks Oregon


View Profile
« Reply #205 on: July 12, 2016, 09:00:42 PM »

So not quite FP, but the Blackwing pencils feel great writing on the Tomoe river paper!  So silky and smooth!
Logged

The terrible thing about free soloing difficult routes is the chance that faced with ultimate danger and need for ultimate self-control, oneís nerve might fail and cause an error. Thatís irony of it,that fear could short-circuit skill,that one would die as a direct result of being afraid to die. R.R
photogeek
Administrator
Trade Count: (0)

Offline Offline

United States United States

Fav. Yo-Yo: Walter
Fav. Trick: Shoot the horse
Posts: 75

Thank You
-Given: 2
-Receive: 27


View Profile
« Reply #206 on: July 16, 2016, 04:12:40 PM »

I have a ton of fountain pens and have enjoyed them for years. From fancy Sheaffers and Watermans to cheaper Safaris and Preppys.

I will admit though, the thing that keeps me from using them even more than I do is the fact that I find them less than optimal for pocket carry (though I've done it a bunch in the past). And pocket carry is where I need a pen most often. So I tend to end up with regular and ultra-fine sharpies in my pocket more than anything.
Logged
photogeek
Administrator
Trade Count: (0)

Offline Offline

United States United States

Fav. Yo-Yo: Walter
Fav. Trick: Shoot the horse
Posts: 75

Thank You
-Given: 2
-Receive: 27


View Profile
« Reply #207 on: July 16, 2016, 04:14:04 PM »

So not quite FP, but the Blackwing pencils feel great writing on the Tomoe river paper!  So silky and smooth!

If you like writing with a pencil, you should absolutely try out the Blackwing ones. Pencil nerds say that they aren't the same as the "original" Blackwings, but whatever. All I know is that they are a pretty nice pencil. I sat down and wrote my grandmother an 8 page letter with one the other day. That's more pencil writing than I've done since elementary school, I suspect.
Logged
beherenow
Trade Count: (32)

Offline Offline

United States United States

Fav. Yo-Yo: KLR
Fav. Trick: Brother slack to Ninja Vanish
Posts: 326

Thank You
-Given: 73
-Receive: 79


Chain Reaction 5.12c Smith Rocks Oregon


View Profile
« Reply #208 on: July 22, 2016, 04:15:14 PM »

I will admit though, the thing that keeps me from using them even more than I do is the fact that I find them less than optimal for pocket carry (though I've done it a bunch in the past). And pocket carry is where I need a pen most often. So I tend to end up with regular and ultra-fine sharpies in my pocket more than anything.

Have you tried a Kaweco?  Great little pocket carry FP.  Nice nibs too.  My clear sport has a gold plated steel nib in bold and it's a buttery smooth writer.
They have a aluminum, stonewashed aluminum, brass, copper, and heat treated colored one's too although they jump up in price a lot over the plastics.
Logged

The terrible thing about free soloing difficult routes is the chance that faced with ultimate danger and need for ultimate self-control, oneís nerve might fail and cause an error. Thatís irony of it,that fear could short-circuit skill,that one would die as a direct result of being afraid to die. R.R
photogeek
Administrator
Trade Count: (0)

Offline Offline

United States United States

Fav. Yo-Yo: Walter
Fav. Trick: Shoot the horse
Posts: 75

Thank You
-Given: 2
-Receive: 27


View Profile
« Reply #209 on: July 22, 2016, 04:39:22 PM »

Have you tried a Kaweco?  Great little pocket carry FP.  Nice nibs too.  My clear sport has a gold plated steel nib in bold and it's a buttery smooth writer.
They have a aluminum, stonewashed aluminum, brass, copper, and heat treated colored one's too although they jump up in price a lot over the plastics.

Funny you should mention it, a Kaweco Sport is the top pen on my "buy" list the next time I've got some cash for a new writing tool.
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 9 10 11 12 13 [14] 15   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Simple Audio Video Embedder
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
YoYoExpert.com - A Division of Ultimate Vision LLC. All Rights Reserved
Email: Contact@YoYoExpert.com   Phone: (413) 551-9696
Home | Learn | Shop | Forum | News | About | Contact
Privacy & Security | Terms of Service | YYE on FacebookYYE on YouTube | Site Map